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David Ziskin

Superintendent of Schools

25 High Street

Fort Plain, NY 13339

518.993.4000

 

 
 

Courses

Courses

  For a list of supplies needed for these courses click HERE.

SOCIAL STUDIES                                        SCIENCE                    MATHEMATICS        

COMPUTER SCIENCE                                  BUSINESS                   SPANISH

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE               HEALTH                     MUSIC

TECHNOLOGY                                              ART                            PHYSICAL EDUCATION  

 

ENGLISH

ENGLISH 7
The purpose of this course is to introduce key literary elements and writing techniques to the entering middle level students. Students will read a wide selection of modern, age-appropriate literature while learning new genres including novels, short stories, drama and poetry. Students will develop a better understanding of basic literary terminology while exploring elements of the humanities. Students will become familiar with note-taking and library research skills, culminating in a 5-8 page research paper at the end of the year. Seventh graders are required to work individually and in groups to develop stronger critical thinking skills through various activities and projects. They will focus on increasing reading comprehension and writing accuracy, as well as listening and speaking skills, in order to meet the New York State middle level English assessment. Tests, quizzes, as well as grammar lessons and vocabulary are given on a regular basis to target and improve problem areas.


ENGLISH 8
A broad range of skills will be covered in this class in preparation for the 8th grade ELA examination. Students will be challenged to think and write critically and draw inferences from what they have read. At the conclusion of each novel and unit test, there will be a thematic essay, which will require students to use evidence from what they have read to support their ideas. Basic rudiments of spelling, grammar, and vocabulary will be covered throughout the course. In an effort to expose students to a broad range of literary genres, students will examine historical fiction, mystery, adventure, short stories, poetry, and plays. Vocabulary, critical reading skills, thematic essays, and Socratic seminars will be incorporated into the classroom to supplement reading materials. Persuasive writing, descriptive writing, business letters, creative and formal writing will be stressed as well.


ENGLISH 9
1 Credit
This course  begins with a study of poetry, with a focus on literary devices, "voice," poetic structures and writing techniques. Students read a variety of genres, both independently and as a class. The study of vocabulary and spelling is done throughout the year, supplemented with mini-grammar lessons. Additionally, the importance of legible handwriting is enforced. Students work in groups and individually to use and improve speaking and listening skills through projects and presentations. Writing pieces include: creative writing, analytical, personal response, critical lens, and persuasive essays. Students are expected to complete a research project 5-7 pages in length. Students will read short stories and both British and American literature. Reading selections include, but are not limited to, Romeo and Juliet, Speak, and Lord of the Flies.


ENGLISH 9 HONORS
1 Credit
The English 9 Honors course is designed for students who demonstrate above-average skills in reading and writing. Class discussions and writing assignments are created as a vehicle for using critical thinking skills. Analysis and application of ideas are an important part of this course. Students will read Romeo and Juliet, and To Kill a Mockingbird, while other reading selections will differ from the standard English 9. English 9 Honors is for the student who has a high-level interest in language arts and is interested in a more challenging course.


ENGLISH 10
1 Credit
This is a standard, Regents-level English course for students in their sophomore year. Students will receive instruction in a variety of English-based skills, including elements of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Of course, all of these elements will be approached, whenever possible, in interesting and innovative ways. Students will read short stories, such as a selection from Edgar Allan Poe; some poetry, including a selection of contemporary poets; The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Robert Louis Stevenson; several novels, such as Ordinary People by Judith Guest and The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho; and plays, such as Brighton Beach Memoirs by Neil Simon and Hamlet by William Shakespeare. In addition, there will be innovative units on fairy/folk tales, gender perspectives, and story-arc and theme analysis through use of popular films such as The Shawshank Redemption. All standard writing formats are covered in this course, including creative, analytical, and personal response. Although no term paper is assigned, students can expect to write several 3-5 page, typed analytical papers, complete with annotated textual references (in the form of identified direct quotes and paraphrases) throughout the academic year.


ENGLISH 10 HONORS
1 Credit
This is an Honors-level English course for students in their sophomore year. The course is similar to the Regents-level English 10 course in regard to basic skill development and practice. However, students in this class undertake a wider scope and depth of study in literature and English skills, and must be ready and able to engage in the work at a deeper level to be successful in this class. In addition, different literature selections are offered to 10H students, and work generally proceeds at a swifter pace. Along with innovative units on gender perspectives and story-arc theme analysis through the use of popular film, students will receive instruction in reading and writing connected to literary classics such as Beowulf (anonymous epic); Grendel, by John Gardner; Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley; works of Jonathan Swift; Hamlet by William Shakespeare; poetry of Wordsworth, Shelley, Blake, and Stevenson; Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and the Tales Of King Arthur And His Knights Of The Round Table, among others. All standard writing formats are covered in this course, including creative, analytical, and personal response. Although no term paper is assigned, students can expect to write several 3-5 page typed analytical papers, complete with annotated textual references in the form of identified direct quotes and paraphrases throughout the academic year.


ENGLISH 11
1 Credit
Becoming more active readers, writers, speakers, and thinkers is the main goal of the English 11R curriculum. Throughout this course, students will read novels, essays, plays, short stories, and poetry. Students will also engage in a variety of writing assignments, including essays, short papers, plays, short stories, articles, journals, poetry, and speeches. They will also prepare for the Comprehensive Regents exam in January.


ENGLISH 11 HONORS
1 Credit
Becoming more insightful and talented readers, writers, speakers, and thinkers is the main goal of the English 11H curriculum. Students will read challenging and thoughtful material that will expand their knowledge and their writing ability. Students taking this class will need to be able to work independently on reading material that will be used for long-term assignments while they are also working on class material that they are studying at the time. Time is also spent on SAT preparation and on vocabulary building.


READING LITERATURE (SUNYA ENG121L)
1 Credit (High School)
3 Credits (College)
(Grade 12)
Pre-requisite – English 11H average of 89 or better, or by arrangement of teacher/parent meeting
Offered under the auspices of SUNY-Albany’s University in the High School Program, the aim of this course is to immerse students in the reading and analysis (in thought and writing) of literature, with selections from fiction, poetry, and drama. This course demands students read approximately 150 pages of new material per week, with an average of writings (both analytical and responsive) of 1,000-1,500 words per week. In addition, several sustained critical papers 5-10 pages in length and one major term paper per semester (20-25 pages) are required. Students will read texts closely and be expected to engage in thoughtful, critical discourse verbally in class and on paper. The fundamental task is to develop each individual’s ability to read well and inventively, and to write with intellectual insight about what they’ve read.

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ENGLISH ELECTIVES


PUBLIC SPEAKING
Credit (half year)
(Grade 12)
Understanding the communication process is a key concept covered in this class. By examining the roles of verbal and nonverbal communication and analyzing the audience when selecting, developing, and presenting a topic, students develop a keen awareness of the many aspects that come into play when speaking publicly. Through a variety of speech experiences that cover personal speeches, speeches to share information, persuasive speeches, social speeches, contest speeches, business and career speeches, and speeches for mass media, students will learn how to gather and present material in a variety of formats. Students will also participate in evaluations of themselves and others as part of the learning process.

SPORTS JOURNALISM
credit
(Grades 10, 11 & 12)
The right topic can capture the interest of even the most reluctant writers. Sports Journalism will provide the perfect blend for sports fanatics and aspiring writers. Knowledge and interest in sports is an important prerequisite for this course. This course is writing intensive and will require students to carry their written work through the writing process in an expedient manner. Ideal candidates for this course will be detail-oriented, responsible, and interested in sports. The ability to produce writing quickly will also be an important quality as newspapers print articles of sporting events the following day. Sports Journalism is the ideal course for the student who wants to keep up with local and professional sports, while also improving his or her writing skills.


FILM STUDIES
Credit
(Grades 11 & 12)
Distance Learning Class
Pre-requisite: teacher recommendation

WRITING A NOVEL
Credit
(Grades 11 & 12)
Distance Learning Class
Pre-requisite: teacher recommendation
Students in this class will examine the structure of successful novel writing, using Christopher Vogler’s The Hero’s Journey as one of the basic texts. Writing exercises on characterization, dialogue, setting, use of the senses, synopsis writing and plot structure will be included. Also, students will receive instruction in the process of successful submission to agents and editors. The course’s culminating event will be the completion of a novel “partial” and cover letter, ready to send to the student’s selected editor or agent.


CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Credit
(Grades 11 & 12)
Distance Learning Class
The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the various themes that run through all children’s literature. This course will help students develop an awareness of the different types of children’s literature and provide a critical basis for evaluation of this literature. Analysis of the artwork that appears in these books will be an integral part of this course. There will be an emphasis on how children’s literature can be used to teach a variety of ethnic, moral, social, and educational concepts. Students will be expected to create storybooks.
 

POPULAR YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE
credit
Grades 11 and 12
Distance Learning

This course will introduce students to popular young adult literature by examining various genres and significant authors and trends. Students will examine the use of a variety of literary elements as a tool to analyze and evaluate each other’s purpose. Through in-class reading, students will have the opportunity to explore issues and personal and social contacts relevant to their own lives, in an attempt to find parallels between their lives and those encountered by the characters. Since literature is sometimes controversial in the junior high and high school context, the issue of censorship will be discussed and assessed. The course will also use various film and media sources appropriate to the study of young adult literature.
 

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SOCIAL STUDIES

 

SOCIAL STUDIES 7
This social studies course covers the history of America to 1865. Major topics include the study of Native Americans, exploration and colonization, the American Revolution and development of a new nation, the formation, policies and practices of the U.S. government, westward expansion, slavery, the Civil War and reconstruction. Students participate in various activities such as debates, mock trials, panel discussions, group projects and hands-on activities.


SOCIAL STUDIES 8
This course completes the two-year curriculum work in American History/Geography. The course begins at the beginning of Reconstruction (post-Civil War) and continues chronologically through the late 1980s. Specific topics include industrialization, immigration, World War I, the Roaring 20s and Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War. Throughout the year, students will actively prepare for the New York State Social Studies Assessment that is given in June.


GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 9
1 Credit
This course is the first half of a chronological history of the world. There is a local mid-year and a final exam. Students spend time reading and interpreting a variety of primary source materials, writing Regents-style essays, doing some projects, and other related work. Areas covered are Asia, Latin America, Africa, and Europe. Also included is geography, especially as it ties in with historical developments. The course includes:
The Ancient World-Civilizations and World Belief Systems (4000 B.C.-500 A.D.)
Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter (500-1200)
Global Interactions (1200-1650)
First Global Age (1450-1770)
An Age of Revolution (1750-French Revolution)


GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 10
1 Credit
This is the second half of a chronological history of the world. There is a local mid-year exam and a Regents exam at the end of the course. Students who do not meet state standards are required to be remediated and retake the Regents exam. Students must read primary source materials, write essays, and complete other related work. Areas covered are Asia, Latin America, Africa, and Europe. Also included is geography, especially as it ties in with historical developments. This course includes:
An Age of Revolution (begin Latin America independence-1914)
A Half Century of Crisis and Achievement (1900-1945)
The 20th Century Since 1945
Global Connections and Interactions (modern day)


UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT
1 Credit
(Grade 11)
This is a course that emphasizes the workings of the United States government. Understanding of the United States Constitution is a central theme of the course. The second part of the course is a chronological history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. A mid-term and final exam are required.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY
1 Credit
(Grade 12)
This is a chronological United States history course. The course enables students to obtain college level credit in United States history. In May, students will take a test composed by the Educational Testing Service. Fee to take this test is $79. Students will also take the United States History and Government test in June. Preceding this course, there is a summer assignment that all students must complete. Students must obtain a recommendation from their 11th grade social studies teacher.

PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT
Credit (half year)
(Grade 12)
The course stresses citizenship and the participation in the electoral process; emphasizes the legal obligation of citizens; and explains how public policy is operated. The course also addresses the legal rights and responsibilities of the individual in civil life, the work place, school, and the international community. Current Events is a vital part of the course.

ECONOMICS AND ECONOMIC DECISION MAKING
Credit (half year)
(Grade 12)
This course is a study of economic decision-making. The course looks at factors that impact economic decisions. Students will look at several economic models and how they impact societies. The stock market, international trade, business cycles, and the government’s control of the economy are emphasized. Also in this course, current events are tied to the curriculum.


BUSINESS LAW
(substitute for: Participation in Government)
Credit
(suggested grade: 12)
This course is the study of our government and court system, consumer law, tort law, criminal law, contracts, and employment. This course helps students become wise consumers and responsible citizens. Field trips and classroom visitors play a vital part of this course.


BUSINESS ECONOMICS
(substitute for: Economics & Economic Decision Making)
Credit
(suggested grade: 12)
This course will help students understand how the economy affects their financial future. They will learn basic economic concepts and apply them to real-life situations. Basic money management skills are taught and students are given $100,000 virtual dollars to invest in the stock market.


INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY (SUNYA PSY101M)
Credit (high school credit)
3 Credit (college)
This is a traditional introductory course in psychology. Topics include research methods and experimental design, biology and behavior, development, learning and conditioning, intelligence and memory, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy. This course will also examine theories of sexuality, personality, sleep and dreams, and social psychology. Students take an active role in their learning through independent research, case studies, labs, experiments and group projects. Students are free to take the course for local credit only, instead of college credit.

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
half-year
This course will offer a variety of topics concerning the practical application of the law and the legal system. The goal is for students to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to become an active and responsible member of society. Individual rights and responsibilities will be reviewed as well as the fundamental aspects of the law. While focusing mainly on criminal law, students will also delve into other specific areas such as juvenile, consumer, housing, and family law. An objective analysis of the legal system's successes and failures will be conducted throughout the course. Opportunities for research a will be given to students who are considering a career in the legal field or law enforcement.


EVERYDAY SOCIOLOGY
half-year
This course will offer a basic understanding of how people interact with each other. The goal is to examine varying situations of everyday life and break down the reasoning of why people might behave in a certain manner when they are within a group. The course will analyze group behavior during everyday occurrences related to social institutions such as school and sporting events among others. This course is designed to expose the student to a basic understanding of what sociologists would consider.
 

INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY (SUNYA SOC115M)
Credit (high school credit)
3 Credit (college)
This is a traditional introductory course in sociology. It deals with interactions between people and the phenomena that those interactions create: social structure, institutions, stratification and collective behavior. Other topics include methods of inquiry, culture, socialization, deviance, crime and social control, group and organizations, racial and ethnic relations, gender and age inequality and social change. Students take an active role in learning through role-play, research, panel discussions and projects. (Students are free to take the course for local credit only, instead of college credit.)


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SCIENCE


LIFE SCIENCE
GRADE 7
Life science, at the intermediate level, studies the concepts, principles, and theories of cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and the interactions between organisms and their environment.


PHYSICAL SCIENCE
GRADE 8
Pre-requisite: Life Science
Physical Science is exploration of matter and energy. Throughout the year, students explore that matter is made of particles whose properties help us distinguish them from one another, the many forms of energy and energy conservation, and how energy and matter interact through forces that result in changes of motion. The course is presented through hands-on activities, problem solving, and critical thinking with heavy emphasis on scientific and mathematical skills.
*Students in grades 9-12 will automatically be enrolled in separate state-mandated laboratory class. Course content will be reinforced by a set number of acceptable written lab reports. Reports will emphasize scientific inquiry, methodology, and lab skills.


EARTH SCIENCE REGENTS (PHYSICAL SETTING)
1 Credit (includes NYS mandated lab requirement)
(Grade 9)
Earth Science studies six major topics from the ground up: geography, geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Throughout the year, students will learn about Earth’s structure and composition. They will discover how geological processes and natural disasters have shaped our planet and how the Earth relates to its neighbors in the cosmos.


EARTH SCIENCE HONORS (PHYSICAL SETTING)
1 Credit (includes NYS mandated lab requirement)
Pre-requisite: 85% or higher overall average (7th and 8th grade science) and high level 3 or level 4 on the 8th grade NYS science assessment.
Honors Earth Science follows the same core content as its Regents counterpart, however, it delves deeper and covers more scope. Lessons move at a faster pace and are oriented towards higher-level thinking skills. More time is spent on mandatory projects and in-depth discussions beyond the normal curriculum.

LABORATORY SCIENCE I
This is a half-year course that allows students to experimentally define and explore key scientific concepts. Students will investigate the mechanics of the scientific method through laboratory experiments. Then, through pre-designed experiments, students will investigate chemistry and physics concepts. This course will be open to any junior or senior who has completed at least their earth science and biology requirements.
 

INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SCIENCE
This is a half-year course providing an overview of the science of foods from nutrition and digestion to processing and preservation. Food chemistry, safety, environmental concerns, and advanced careers in food science and technology will be covered. This course is open to any junior or senior who has completed at least their earth science and biology requirements.


LIVING ENVIRONMENT (LIVING ENVIRONMENT SETTING)
1 Credit
(Grade 10)
Pre-requisite: Earth Science
The course is based on provided notes which correspond to the NYS curriculum and lecture explanation of those notes with frequent quizzes, daily vocabulary homework, and unit tests in which the vocabulary homework may be used. Students will be given, either through review or study guides, exactly what information is to be quizzed. Each quiz also includes questions from the current lab. A sample test will be given and reviewed prior to each unit test. A cumulative midterm examination is given with a Regents Examination at the end of the year.


LIVING ENVIRONMENT HONORS (LIVING ENVIRONMENT SETTING)
1 Credit
(Grade 10)
Pre-requisite: 85% or higher average in Earth Science
The Living Environment Honors course is designed to have success in Regents-level Biology, and develop the skills needed to continue into Advanced Placement Biology as a junior. The course is based on provided notes, fast-paced question and answer discussion, and supplemental lectures which encompass numerous topics not contained in the notes. Frequent quizzes, daily vocabulary homework, and unit tests provide a majority of the overall grade. Preparation for quizzes is based on independent reading, and two or more sample tests are given prior to a unit test. Essay writing is practiced with brainstorm questions and time management skills emphasized. Quarterly projects and/or presentations along with a required MST Fair experiment are additional grades required. A cumulative midterm examination is given with a Regents Examination at the end of the year.

CHEMISTRY (PHYSICAL SETTING)
1 Credit
(Grade 11)
Pre-requisite: Current enrollment in Math B or higher
Chemistry instruction will focus on the understanding of concepts, relationships, processes, mechanisms, models, and applications of the following: atomic theory, the periodic table, physical behavior of matter, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry.


PHYSICS (PHYSICAL SETTING)
1 Credit
(Grade 12)
Pre-requisite: current enrollment in Pre-Calc or higher
Physics studies the mathematical relationships, processes, mechanisms, and applications of the following topics: mechanics, energy, electricity and magnetism, wave phenomena, modern physics, motion, internal energy, optics, solid state physics, and nuclear energy.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (LIVING ENVIRONMENT SETTING)
1 Credit
(Grade 11 OR 12)
Pre-requisite: Top 15 students based on the average of four components -Earth
Science grade, Earth Science Regents Exam score, Living Environment grade, and Living Environment Regents Exam score.
Advanced Placement Biology is a college introductory survey course. The national curriculum emphasizes three general areas covered in most freshman college courses: molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations. The course helps students develop a framework for future studies in modern biology and to appreciate science as a process. College credit may be earned based on the student’s results on a required AP Biology examination and the particular requirements determined by individual colleges.

Provided notes along with lecture give the background for multiple choice homework, two essays, and a unit test for each of 14 units. Twelve required labs supplement the curriculum, allow students to work with high-tech equipment and learn proper lab skills, and provide practice in analyzing data. A summer assignment is given, collected, and graded at the start of the course. It is recommended that students enrolled in AP Biology also enroll in Regents Chemistry as many of the same topics are utilized in each course.

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 7
Math 7 is for the general 7th grade population. It is the basic introduction to algebraic concepts.


ADVANCED MATH 7
Students may choose this class if they have maintained approximately an 85 (or above) average and have the recommendation of the sixth grade math teacher. The class is designed to prepare students for the accelerated Math 8 class which is a Regents class.


MATH 8
Pre-requisite: Math 7 or Adv. Math 7
First instruction focuses on student understanding of each skill then couples the skill with how it is used in daily life. Topics include algebra, patterns and functions, probability, geometry, problem solving, number theory and measurement. Math 8 continues to build the foundation for high school math.


ALGEBRA 8
1 Credit
Pre-requisite: Math 7 (85% or higher)
Adv. Math 7 (80% or higher)
This is the first year of the Algebra/Geometry/Algebra II and Trigonometry sequence listed below.


ALGEBRA 1 (1st year)
ALGEBRA 2 (2nd year)
2 Credits
This is a two-year sequence designed for students with weaker math skills. A student must pass Algebra 1 before entering Algebra 2. The Algebra Regents exam is given in June of the second year.


GEOMETRY
1 Credit
This is an option for students who have successfully completed Algebra 1 and Algebra 2 to meet their third year math requirement. Students needing a fourth math credit would continue in Geometry.


MATH B
1 Credit
Math B is the course that follows Math AB. It explores graphing functions, conic sections, transformations, probability and statistics, and triangle trigonometry. Students will take the Math B Regents in June.


ALGEBRA
1 Credit
Algebra is the first math course in high school. It provides tools and ways of thinking that are necessary for solving problems in a variety of disciplines. Linear, quadratic, absolute value, and exponential functions, systems of equations, matrix, measurement, data analysis and more will be studied.


GEOMETRY
1 Credit
Geometry is the second course in high school mathematics. This course employs an integrated approach to the study of geometric relationships and includes congruence and similarity or triangles, quadrilaterals and circles. Geometry leads to an understanding that reasoning and proof are fundamental aspects of math.


TRIGONOMETRY
1 Credit
This is the third high school math course. It is a continuation and extension of Algebra and Geometry. Imaginary and complex numbers, logarithmic functions, data analysis, sequences, circular functions and problem solving will be explored.


PRE-CALCULUS
1 Credit (High School) 3 Credits (College)
Pre-requisite: Math B
This course is intended for students who plan to take Calculus here or in college. (Students are free to take the course for either college credit or local credit.)


CALCULUS
1 Credit (High School)
This is a college level course. Calculus I (SUNYA MAT112Y) will be offered for 4 college credits. (Students are free to take the course for local credit only instead of college credit. All students are encouraged to sit for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.)

CALCULATOR MATH
1 Credit
This course is offered to students with at least one credit of high school Algebra. Students will gain a deep knowledge of the graphing calculator while doing mathematic topics from Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE


 

WEB PAGE DESIGN I
credit
Pre-requisite: Keyboarding or Computer Applications
Web technology is the ultimate computing environment. This introductory course has been designed for people interested in Web Design who have an artistic or creative nature. It provides an excellent introduction to the field of web design technology. Students will use a variety of software programs to make their page fun to make and use.


VIDEO GAME DESIGN --- NEW!
1/2 credit
Pre-requisite: Keyboarding or Computer Applications
Besides being entertaining, video games are a booming industry. In this half-year course, students will learn how to create digital stories and ultimately their own video games through a variety of software programs. The class will also explore topics such as careers in the game industry, history of video games, storytelling, and game marketing.


COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I
Credit (half year)
(Grades 9-12)
Students will learn the introductory functions of the computer software program AutoCAD Light through the practice of mechanical and architectural drawings. Students will be able to develop their skills by designing creative original projects.

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN II
Credit (half year)
(Grades 9-12)
Students will perfect and further develop the skills learned in Computer Aided Design I. The fundamentals of three-dimensional drawing will be introduced. Students will design original architectural, mechanical and creative projects.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Credit
(suggested grades: 9,10,11,12)
Over and over again, returning students say that this course is the most valuable course taken in high school. This class will introduce students to major computer applications: publishing, spreadsheets, word processing, Internet applications and presentations all while improving keyboarding skills. This course should definitely be put on your list of “courses to take before leaving high school.” These skills are a MUST for college bound and workforce students!

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BUSINESS

COMPUTER 7
This new course will help you build on the keyboarding skills learned in 6th grade through a variety of computer-based projects. Be prepared to work together to create and publish your work by using a variety of software programs.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Credit
(suggested grades: 9,10,11,12)
Over and over again, returning students say that this course is the most valuable course taken in high school. This class will introduce students to major computer applications: publishing, spreadsheets, word processing, Internet applications and presentations all while improving keyboarding skills. This course should definitely be put on your list of “courses to take before leaving high school.” These skills are a MUST for college bound and workforce students!

MONEY MANAGEMENT
Credit
(suggested grade: 9, 10)
The ability to manage the money gives people the things in life they want. That’s called financial planning. Developing sound financial skills helps people make good decisions about money that can bring about financial success for a lifetime. Students will learn how to “grow money”, how to develop healthy financial habits and how to be smart consumers. Suze Orman would be proud!

ACCOUNTING
(Substitute for – 3rd year math)
1 Credit
(suggested grades: 11,12)
Knowledge gained from this course will be used both by students who attend college and by those who work after high school. It is a course designed for students to learn basic accounting, including basic concepts and procedures used to keep the business records of a sole-proprietorship and partnership. They will also learn about keeping personal records organized. Computerized accounting is introduced.

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
1 Credit
(suggested grade: 12)
Pre-requisite: Accounting
This course is a “must” for students who will attend college for business. This advanced program builds on Accounting (above) but focuses on departmental accounting, accounting control systems (inventory) and general accounting adjustments all through independent study. Computerized accounting is used.

BUSINESS LAW
(substitute for – Participation in Government)
Credit
(suggested grade: 12)
This course is the study of our government and court system, consumer law, tort law, criminal law, contracts, and employment all through the eyes of business. In this course, students become wise consumers and responsible citizens. Field trips and classroom visitors play a vital part of this course.

BUSINESS ECONOMICS
(substitute for – Economics & Economic Decision Making)
Credit
(suggested grade: 12)
This course will help students understand how the economy affects their financial future. They will learn basic economic concepts and apply those concepts to real-life situations.


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SPANISH

SPANISH 7
This course is the first half of Level 1. Speaking and listening skills are reinforced, and reading and writing skills are gradually added in the target language. Students are encouraged to communicate in Spanish.
 

SPANISH 8
1 Credit
This course is the second half of Level 1. Much of the first quarter of the year is spent reviewing, reinforcing, and refining what was learned in 7th grade. Students are encouraged to demonstrate a higher level of mastery of structure, but the emphasis is still on being able to listen, speak, read and write in Spanish.
 

SPANISH I
1 Credit
This course is Level 1 and is offered for students who transfer into Fort Plain from another district, or for students who did not successfully complete the Spanish 7-8 program in Fort Plain. This course is a one-year version of Spanish 7-8, with more emphasis in individualized instruction and mastery of basic structures.
 

SPANISH II
1 Credit
Pre-requisite: Spanish I
Spanish II stresses the importance of being able to communicate in various time frames, and introduces the vocabulary needed to deal with more real life situations. Students read more culturally authentic materials, and write longer paragraphs in the target language. A higher level of communication skills in all four aspects of language acquisition is needed.
 

SPANISH III
1 Credit
Pre-requisite: Spanish II
Spanish III is a review of much of the grammar used in Spanish II, and a course leading to the students being able to communicate even more efficiently in Spanish. Much of the course is conducted in Spanish, including classroom discussions and grammar explanations. Students must take the Comprehensive Spanish Regents exam.


SPANISH IV (SUNYA SPN103)
1 Credit (High School)
4 Credits (College Level)
Pre-requisite: Spanish III
Reading, writing, speaking and listening are conducted in cycles that include grammar studies, thematic vocabulary reinforcement, thematic essay writing, culturally authentic Spanish literature, written projects, and communicative projects. The emphasis is shifted to using the language as a part of daily life. (Students are free to take the course for local credit instead of college credit.)


SPANISH V (SUNYA SPN104)
1 Credit (High School)
4 Credits (College Level)
Pre-requisite: Spanish IV
The skills that were achieved in Spanish IV are reinforced in Spanish V. Students progress from reading short stories to reading a novel in Spanish. The students will work on cultural and written projects as well as communicative projects. Grammar will be taught through literature. (Students are free to take the course for local credit only instead of college credit.)

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HEALTH

HEALTH 8
Fort Plain provides a Comprehensive School Health Education program within the scope of the eight conceptual areas: Mental and Emotional Health, Personal Health and Nutrition, Family Living Growth and Development, Consumer and Community Health, Prevention and Control of Disease, Environmental Health, Substance Use and Abuse, and Injury Prevention and Safety. These areas are covered within the design matrix of the state and national standards for health education.


HEALTH/WELLNESS
Credit (*required for graduation)
This course goes in to more depth as related to functional knowledge of the conceptual areas. The class is moving into the arena of the health skills matrix, which is designed to be a standards-based curriculum. The conceptual area curriculum includes the following: Mental and Emotional Health, Personal Health and Nutrition, Family Living Growth and Development, Consumer and Community Health, Environmental Health, Prevention and Control of Disease, Substance Use and Abuse, and Injury Prevention and Safety.

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FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

 

HOME AND CAREER SKILLS
(Grade 7)
The home and career skills program prepares students to apply the principles and process skills of decision making, problem solving and management to all areas of daily life. It is a 30 week program which fulfills of a unit for middle school students. The areas of study include: personal development, personal and family resource management (consumer skills, financial management, nutrition and wellness) and career planning (overview of work, career plans and entrepreneurship).

BASIC CLOTHING (Clothing and Textile Core)
Credit
This course gives students a foundation for clothing and textiles as they relate to individual needs and the needs of others. It provides for understanding of clothing as a complex blending of instinct, emotion, values and social relations; and provides opportunity to develop construction and care skills. Information is given for the care, selection, maintenance and recycling of a wardrobe. The course provides basic textile knowledge and experiences to aid in the purchase and use of clothing and household textiles. Career opportunities are explored.


BASIC FOODS (Food & Nutrition Core)
Credit
The course is designed to help students apply nutrition knowledge to everyday living, develop skills in menu planning, food purchasing, preparation and service. Students will also explore careers and employment opportunities in the food and nutrition field.
 

FASCINATING FOODS (Home & Personal Management)
Credit
Students will learn about the history and foods of the United States and foreign countries. They will plan, prepare and serve the complete meal which is satisfying to family members. They will also have an experience in working with foods that are unfamiliar. Class consists of lectures, demonstrations and a meal every week.


PARENTING (formerly  Family & Environment)
(Human Development)
Credit (*required for FPCS graduation)
(Grade 10)
The Parenting course is designed to prepare students with the knowledge and skills needed to be responsible parents and caring citizens. Students will understand roles and responsibilities of parenting, human growth and development of the child and be able to identify traits of a healthy family.

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TECHNOLOGY

TECHNOLOGY 8
Topics of exploration will include but not be limited to problem solving skills, manufacturing and production methods, electricity and electronics, transportation systems, communication systems, environmental technology, systems and sub-systems, information technology, technical drawing, engineering methods, and bio-technology. Students will apply basic principles of mathematics and science in a hands-on environment while learning basic skills involving the use of hand tools and machinery. This application-driven program will serve to identify areas of interest while preparing students to make informed career/education choices. Students will complete several projects, and are encouraged to work independently on specific areas of interest. This course will also serve as a pre-requisite for the High School Technology program, which includes cutting-edge courses such as Computer Aided Design (CAD), Welding Principles, Electricity/Electronics, Small Engines, Agricultural/Bio-Technology, and the world renowned Cisco Networking Academy, which has established the baselines for the most valued technical application of our era, Information Technology.


BASIC WOODWORKING
Credit
(Grades 9-12)
This course is designed to teach basic woodworking and design skills. Students are introduced to some fundamental design concepts and construction techniques and will immerse themselves in a project from start to finish. Classes include both power and hand tool use, with an emphasis on joinery skills that require extensive hand tool use. Safety is a major emphasis throughout. Basic indoor and outdoor furniture designs will be stressed, along with student woodworking projects.


COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN I
Credit (half year)
(Grades 9-12)
Students will learn the introductory functions of the computer software program AutoCAD Light through the practice of mechanical and architectural drawings. Students will be able to develop their skills by designing creative original projects.


COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN II
Credit (half year)
(Grades 9-12)
Students will perfect and further develop skills learned in Computer Aided Design I. The fundamentals of three-dimensional drawing will be introduced. Students will design original architectural, mechanical and creative projects.


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ART

ART 7
An art course incorporating interdisciplinary units of learning through historical arts and crafts. Included are units on Native Americans, colonial times, and a unit on famous artists.


STUDIO IN ART
1 Credit
This is a foundation art course that is a year-long introduction to the nature, function and techniques of the visual arts from the past to the present. It attempts to help students to see, feel, think, express their thoughts and feelings, make choices, and evaluate through a wide variety of studio experiences. Texts are too many and varied to list, as no one text is used. Books available in the library and art room are used for reference and student notes, hand outs, and dittos are taken from many sources. These are reinforced with filmstrips, tapes, slides, prints and field trips when possible.

Evaluation is based on student work, objectives of student assignments and by testing of notes given for the course dealing with various media. Also a determination is made of whether the student has developed his own style, interpretation and appreciation of the arts.


CRAFTS
1 Credit
Crafts is a course open to all students and is especially useful for students who want to enjoy art but feel that they lack the talent to handle a more advanced art course. It is designed to teach the fundamentals of two and three-dimensional design, encourage creativity, and build an understanding and appreciation of various crafts and materials.

Texts are too many to list as no one text is used. Books available in the art room and the library are supplemented with magazine articles on various crafts. Student notes are taken from all of these sources. Evaluation is based upon completion of various craft assignments and the proper usage of materials and mediums. Testing of students is based upon notes given for each craft or medium pursued.


CERAMICS
Credit
This class is designed for students who are interested in working with clay. The course covers many approaches to the use of clay and encourages students to explore the methods of greatest interest and value to them. Texts are varied and too many to list, as no one text is used. Books available in the library and art room are used for reference. Student notes are taken from many sources. Evaluation is based on student work, objectives of student assignments, use of tools and materials needed for each activity and testing based on notes given for each method.

SCULPTURE
Credit
Sculpture is an advanced course designed to develop in students the knowledge and understanding of the esthetic principles and skills involved in working on a 3-dimensional basis. Students solve given assignments on the nature of the mediums potentials and limitations. Texts are varied and too many to list, as no one text is used. Books available in the library and art room are used for reference. Students notes are taken from many sources. Evaluation is based on student work, objectives of student assignments, use of tools and materials needed for each activity and testing based on notes given for each medium.


GRAPHICS
1 Credit
Printmaking is concerned with the art of using lines, solid masses, tones and textures in such a manner that many proofs may be produced or pulled from an original. The course covers a variety of processes and materials for exploration. Texts are too many to list. No one text is used, as many in the art room and library are used as reference. Students notes are taken from many sources. Evaluation is based on student work, objectives of student assignments, use of tools and materials needed for each activity and testing based on notes given for each medium.


DRAWING AND PAINTING I
1 Credit
The beginning of the course is devoted to a foundation of experiences in drawing and painting. The remainder of the course is devoted to varying experiences and techniques of working in a variety of mediums – developing the student’s awareness of each medium and it’s potential. Texts are too may and varied to list, as no one text is used. Books available in the library and art room used for reference, student notes, hand outs and dittos are taken from many sources. These are reinforced with filmstrips, tapes, slides, prints and field trips when possible. Evaluation is based upon student work and the objectives put forth when assignments are given including use of medium, exploration of its potential and limitations, growth of the student work and testing of notes given for each medium pursued and related art history.


ART APPRECIATION
1 Credit
(suggested grade 10, 11, 12)
This course is a survey of western visual arts, (mostly paintings, sculptures, and architecture) from primitive man through our time period. Students would learn about various cultures that have affected and influenced western civilization. Some of the major topics would include such things as: Neolithic, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Germanic, Christian, Byzantine, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, and the modern movements up until the present day.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Credit
Digital Photography is a half-year course that introduces students to the history of photography from the pinhole to the digital camera. Students will learn how a digital camera operates and gain knowledge of image manipulation. Students will create folders, download, edit and print their photographs using Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0. This software program will introduce students to creative use of techniques that include layering, color correction, filters (paint, lighting, text, etc.). Students will also learn about composition and how it relates to photography. Photo concentrations will be on landscapes, portraits, still life, architectural structures, candid shots, abstract photomontage and a photo essay (at least five photos).

Students will be responsible for readings and end of chapter activities from their text book, “Focus on Photography.” Supplemental readings will be from current photo magazines. A research paper on a famous photographer will be required.

Internet Digital Photography web sites will be used so students can download their photos for professional prints, electronic slide show photo albums and be able to create personal mouse pads, mugs, T-Shirts, calendars, and a ten-page photo album of their work. Students will also gain knowledge of matting and framing two of their best prints. Evaluation is based upon completion of weekly photo assignments and written text material. Testing is based upon textbook material, supplemental notes and software knowledge.

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MUSIC

GENERAL MUSIC 7 & 8
A generalized music course covering all aspects of music study offered to seventh grade students not involved in Band or Chorus.


BAND 7 & 8
Pre-requisite: 2-3 years prior experience
Students play band instruments, learn music, and perform at concerts. They should have 2 or 3 years of prior experience playing in beginner/elementary band. Program includes weekly lessons for all students.


CHORUS 7 & 8
Students prepare a variety of choral music for at least two concerts a year. Attendance at concerts is required.


HIGH SCHOOL BAND
Credit
Pre-requisite: four years prior experience
Students play band instruments, learn music and perform at public events, including concerts, parades, graduations, ceremonies, etc. Students should have at least four years of prior experience playing in elementary/junior band.


HIGH SCHOOL CHORUS
Credit
Students prepare a variety of choral music for at least two concerts per year. Attendance is required at concerts. This performing group also competes each year in the spring. Taking two years of chorus fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.


COMPUTER MUSIC TECHNOLOGY I
Credit
Students will learn how to operate the audio and visual equipment owned by the school. Instruction will include audio recording, mixing and live performance engineering. Students will also learn setting light designs for live performances.


COMPUTER MUSIC TECHNOLOGY II
Credit
Pre-requisite: Computer Music Tech I
This course uses the fundamentals learned in Music Tech 1 and expands them to incorporate Power-point presentations with i-photo and original compositions; using music with web-design; recording, editing, and mastering CDs; and video technology. Students’ projects will be put on the FPCS web-site.


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